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Author: The CNCL Team

Melting Permafrost Releasing High Levels of Nitrous Oxide, A Potent Greenhouse Gas

Thawing permafrost in the Arctic may be releasing 12 times as much nitrous oxide as previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide, can remain in the atmosphere for up to 114 years, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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Saying Goodbye to Planet Earth

Chris Hedges argues that “the human-induced change to the ecosystem, at least for many thousands of years, will probably make the biosphere inhospitable to most forms of life [without] halting our consumption of fossil fuels, converting to a plant-based diet and dismantling the animal agriculture industry as well as greening deserts and restoring rainforests.”

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The Martyrdom of Julian Assange

The arrest Thursday of Julian Assange eviscerates all pretense of the rule of law and the rights of a free press. The illegalities, embraced by the Ecuadorian, British and U.S. governments, in the seizure of Assange are ominous. They presage a world where the internal workings, abuses, corruption, lies and crimes, especially war crimes, carried out by corporate states and the global ruling elite will be masked from the public.

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Turning the Tide – WWF Reports on 50 Years of Collaboration for Whale and Dolphin Conservation

Turning the tide briefly charts our growing  understanding of whales and dolphins, the  threats facing these intriguing creatures and the evolution of conservation approaches over the years. The report catalogues the rudimentary research techniques of the sixties right up to contemporary breakthrough technologies such as acoustic monitoring, genetic sampling, and satellite tagging, now applied to answer complex scientific questions. Ironically, the more we unravel the mysteries of these magnificent creatures, the more we realize that we are not curbing the activities that contribute towards the precipitous declines in their populations.

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Peace Of Mind: Mindfulness And Pro-Animal Behavior

Empirical evidence has shown correlations between mindfulness and ecological behavior, pointing out the potential of mindfulness to support changes in behavior toward greater sustainability as well as building intrinsic values and empathy towards other living creatures. Mindfulness practice is a powerful tool for veg*n education.

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A Dose of Reality: How Climate Change Affects our Kids, Straight From a Pediatrician

Millions of children are already affected by climate change, around the world and in the US. By virtue of its effect on sea levels, more frequent and severe hurricanes, heatwaves and droughts, air pollution, forest fires, and increases in infectious diseases, climate change is already affecting the way children live. The relentless destruction of ecosystems is depriving our children of experiencing nature’s beauty, clean air, safe drinking and recreational water, nutritious food supplies, and safe shelter.

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The Insect Apocalypse Is Coming

In a new report, scientists warn of a precipitous drop in the world’s insect population, a situation that could be just as catastrophic to humans as it is to insects. To avoid insect apocalypse, we need to reduce the size of our agricultural footprint.

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The (Other) Economic Madness of the Green New Deal

A green new deal that creates new jobs and stimulates economic growth amounts to little more than a final blow-out binge before our once-and-done global economy comes crashing down around our ears. The only means of mitigating the environmental catastrophe that is gathering pace around us is to engage in a managed process of de-growth to create far smaller, localised and less consumptive economies than we have had for many decades.

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Making Sense of the Walrus Scene in Our Planet

Because of rising temperatures due to climate change, Pacific walruses in the Bering Strait are losing their ice habitats. Instead of congregating in smaller groups on sea ice where they get better access to food, they are being driven on to land to haul-out in large numbers.

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Israel’s Merciless Bombing of the Gaza Strip

The bombs start again. Israel, as if on a timer, begins to pulverize Gaza. The bombs strike from one end of the country to another, a warning against the protests that have been ongoing for a year. There is a shudder from Gaza, phone calls to friends who say that they are fearful that this bombing run will escalate.

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Leading the Public Into Emergency Mode

Imagine there is a fire in your house. What do you do? What do you think about? The climate crisis is an unprecedented emergency. It is the United States’ top national security threat, public health threat, and moral emergency. How we react to the climate crisis will shape centuries and millennia to come.

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Medea Benjamin & Stephen Zunes: Peacemaker’s delegation to Iran

Codepink leader (and Global Exchange co-founder), Medea Benjamin and University of San Francisco Middle East specialist Stephen Zunes, are freshly back from a large people-to-people delegation to Iran. View this webinar for an in-depth report-back from their trip. They will share stories heard and perspectives gained from their encounters with Iranians from all walks of life — including the Foreign Minister.

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New U.N. Study Finds Air and Water Pollution Causes Millions of Deaths Each Year

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, greenhouse gas emissions from raising farmed animals make up about 15 percent of global human-induced emissions. The Environmental Protection Agency identifies animal agriculture as a primary source of water pollution, as manure runoff and animal waste flood surface and groundwater with nitrogen and phosphorus.

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Venezuela in the US Press

International opinion largely opposes Donald Trump’s current and threatened intervention in Venezuela, but that’s not the impression you get US corporate news media, who appear to be all-in with Trump’s push for the ouster of democratically elected President Nicolás Maduro. Interviews with Chesa Boudin, Dan Beeton, Laura Carlsen, Mark Weisbrot, Miguel Tinker Salas and Alfredo Lopez.

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Rain is Melting Greenland’s Ice, Even in Winter, Raising Fears about Sea Level Rise

Rising global temperatures are making Greenland feel a bit more like the United Kingdom—and that’s bad news for the ice sheet that covers the massive arctic island. Rain is becoming more frequent, melting ice and setting the stage for far more melt in the future, according to a new study. Even more disturbing, researchers say, is that raindrops are pockmarking areas of the ice sheet even in the dead of winter and that as the climate warms, those areas will expand.

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We Are Being Lied Into War Again

The invasion of Iraq just felt like it was a lie to me. And it turned out that I was right, that it was a lie, and that the entirety of the mainstream media and our government were either wrong or lying and, most of the time, both.Now our government and our media are trying their damnedest to lie us into another war, this one with Venezuela.

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Women in the Global Food Movement

This Friday, for the first time, Germany’s capital joins many countries around the world in celebrating Women’s Day with a public holiday. To mark the occasion, ProVeg highlights some of the women working in various sectors of the global food movement.

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Our Research Shows Drug Tests on Animals Don’t Predict Results in Humans

A new scientific publication by the Cruelty Free International science team, looking at whether drug tests on animals help predict human responses, has been published in the scientific journal BMC Medical Ethics. The paper shows how after decades of animal use in human drug development, there is little evidence to support using animals in drug tests, or to suggest that animals can effectively predict how people will react to drugs.

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The War on Venezuela Is Built on Lies

A war has been declared on Venezuela, of which the truth is “too difficult” to report. It is too difficult to report the blocking of Venezuela’s access to the US-dominated international financial system as sabotage. It is too difficult to report Washington’s “sanctions” against Venezuela, which have caused the loss of at least $6billion in Venezuela’s revenue since 2017, including $2billion worth of imported medicines, as illegal, or the Bank of England’s refusal to return Venezuela’s gold reserves as an act of piracy.

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Japan Begins Culling Thousands of Pigs as Swine Fever spreads

Japanese authorities were battling to contain swine flu on Wednesday (Feb 6) after the virus was detected at multiple sites in central Japan.Japanese soldiers and local government officials began slaughtering around 6,600 pigs at a farm in Toyota City in Aichi prefecture following the confirmation of an outbreak of swine fever, also known as hog cholera, there.

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Climate Change Denial (the Other Sort) is Alive and Well

I leave it to readers to decide which is the more deplorable, the politician who refuses to accept the science or the politician who accepts the science but then behaves as if the science is a hoax. There is, however, clearly a different kind of climate change denial going on here; one that plays dangerously to the narrative of right wing false populists.

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Burnout: The Toll of Studying Climate Change

Studying climate change can take its emotional toll. Some scientists and activists have experienced grief, depression, and anxiety. Some have received death threats. The Agenda looks beyond the science to the psychological strain climate change can have on those that know it best.

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3 Tips for New Vegans

Making the decision to transition away from animal foods and products can present a few challenges, as can any serious life transition. Mic the Vegan offers us a few of his own tips in this process (along with some of his unique humour).

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2018: A Year of Climate Extremes

This year we learned, once again, that climate change is not a distant phenomenon—it is here right now. Extreme weather hit communities around the globe, ice and glaciers shrunk and global greenhouse gas emissions grew. Many of these events are in line with projections of a warming world. At the same time, our understanding of climate science greatly improved, allowing us to better understand past impacts and what the future holds.

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9 States Sue ‘Flat-Out Wrong’ Trump Administration Over Seismic Blasting in Atlantic

During these seismic surveys, ships fire blasts of air to the bottom of the sea every 10 to 12 seconds for weeks or months at a time to map the contours of the ocean floor in search of oil and gas deposits. The loud, continuous and far-reaching noise can damage the hearing and potentially disorientate and kill marine life, displace fish, devastate zooplankton and cause whales to beach.

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The Bee Crisis

With less bees, less pollen will be transferred, resulting in less developed fruit, and less food for us. If the bees dies out, then so will our supply of fruits and vegetables.

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(Ted Talk – Angel Hsu) How China is (and isn’t) fighting pollution and climate change

China is the world’s biggest polluter — and now one of its largest producers of clean energy. Which way will China go in the future, and how will it affect the global environment? Data scientist Angel Hsu describes how the most populous country on earth is creating a future based on alternative energy — and facing up to the environmental catastrophe it created as it rapidly industrialized.

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Joanna Macy – The Hidden Promise of Our Dark Age | Bioneers

One of the great activists and spiritual teachers of our era, Joanna Macy, brings a hopeful message: If we can free ourselves from the delusions and dependencies bred by the “industrial growth society,” something wonderful can happen. If we manage to steer clear of panic, we may well find, at last, the wild power of our creativity and solidarity.

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A Marine Ecological Crisis in Southeast Asia

Across the globe, marine habitats are in a state of dramatic decline. According to a recent study by the Wildlife Conservation Society, only 13 percent of the planet’s oceans are untouched by human activity. The only unaffected portions are in remote protected parts of the Pacific Ocean and around the poles; even there, apparently, the tide is turning, making the waters unsafe for marine life.

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The Fountain of Youth is Made of Fruits and Veggies, Not $100 Moisturizers

Choices made about nutrition are the most powerful environmental factors that influence gene activity, followed by fitness, quality of sleep, toxins including smoking, and stress. Our genes may load the “longevity and health” gun, but lifestyle pulls the trigger, or not. A brief description of some of the ground-breaking experiments that can impact your chances of a long and healthy life, called your healthspan, follows.

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Dying of Consumption While Guzzling Snake Oil: a Realist’s Perspective on the Environmental Crisis

We can’t splurge anymore as individuals, but more critically, as industries and as societies. In fact, we couldn’t afford to overindulge decades ago, and we should have never done so in the first place. We don’t need science to understand this, and we don’t need an ecological footprint calculator. We need empathy and a sense of connection with all life on the planet.

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Plant-based Health: The Doctors Tell All

Heard The Word On The Street That Plant-Based Lifestyles Are Good For You? Well these five Kiwi Doctors certainly think so! From preventing long term diseases to helping treat them, they explain how eating plants is “actually the best thing you can do for your health!”

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Humanity’s True Purpose

Is humanity nothing more than a cancer on the planet, consuming its host until it is gone, guaranteeing its own destruction in the process? A quick glance at the effects of our behavior might lead us to say yes.But looks can be deceiving. Nature shows us that what is destructive on one level can also be part of a larger process of change that creates new forms of value at another level.

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Big Pharma Paid Millions in Secret Settlements After Antidepressants Linked to Mass Murder

While history has shown that the most notorious mass shooters in this century were taking antidepressants or Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) before they carried out the deadly rampages, there are a number of killings that have been linked directly to the dangerous drugs. In fact, the pharmaceutical companies behind the most popular SSRI’s have paid hundreds of millions of dollars in damages

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Animal Agriculture is Choking the Earth and Making Us Sick – We Must Act Now

Our collective minds are stuck on this idea that talking about food’s environmental impact risks taking something very intimate away from us. In fact it’s just the opposite. Reconsidering how we eat offers us hope, and empowers us with choice over what our future planet will look like. And we can ask our local leaders – from city mayors to school district boards to hospital management – to help, by widening our food options.

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(Ted Talk – Sean Davis) Lessons from the World Avoided

30 years after signing of The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, the “World’s most successful environmental treaty”, the ozone layer is beginning to heal. Climate scientist Sean Davis reflects on this environmental success story and the world we’ve avoided by our efforts to save the ozone layer, and offers lessons we can carry forward in addressing the environmental crisis of our time – global warming.

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Inter-species Love…

Whether you need a reminder about how humans are not the only animals capable (and in need of) love, or if you just need a quick dose of heartfelt warmth and hope, then this little video should do the trick.

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The Curtain Comes Down on Ringling

Circuses around the world that beat Ringling to the punch in making the decision to stop using animals are thriving. But Ringling stonewalled for decades, hoping that the mounting protests by people who care about animals’ welfare—PETA members and supporters, other animal rights organizations and grassroots groups that challenged the circus at every stop in every city—would somehow disappear. It was a terrible miscalculation.

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From Apartheid to Ecovillages | Kosha Joubert | TEDxFindhorn

“Apartheid is not an old issue that died in the nineties”, Kosha tells us. “Apartheid means ‘to be in a state of separation’” and it is still with us as many live in a state of separation from nature. Kosha sees Ecovillages as engaged in, “finding local solutions to global challenges, creating healthy, fulfilling and meaningful lifestyles yet be able to tread softly on the earth”.

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