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Author: The CNCL Team

Climate Catastrophe Comes for Europe

When most people think of climate change, what come to mind are the poles, Asia’s fast vanishing glaciers, or Australia, where punishing droughts are drying up the sub-continent’s longest river, the Murray. But climate change is an equal opportunity disrupter, and Europe is facing a one-two punch of too much water in the north and center and not enough in the south.

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Ecological Trauma and Common Addiction

Rex Weyler defines “ecological trauma” as the experience of witnessing – consciously or not – the pervasive abuse and destruction of the natural world, of which we are a part, and for which we have a primal affinity.

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How to Get Better at Thrift Shopping

“Shop second-hand” is a message often touted by eco-minded individuals, myself included. “It’s good for the planet! It’s good for your wallet!” we say, which is all good advice, but usually that’s where it ends. Fortunately, some professional guidance for navigating thrift stores is at hand.

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Ecosocialism & Just Transition

Climate change requires major societal change. But how do we ensure this transformation is done in a fair and just manner? John Bellamy Foster—a renowned environmental sociologist and editor of Monthly Review—takes a look at the idea of the Just Transition, arguing that any strategy to save the planet must go beyond the strictures of capitalism.

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Cruel Taiji Dolphin Drive Hunt Season Underway

Fishermen in the coastal town of Taiji, Japan have begun their controversial annual dolphin hunt. These hunts run from September to April, and involve the corralling of dolphins at sea by small boats and driving them into the confines of a cove where they are slaughtered for meat or kept alive for lucrative sale to marine parks and aquaria across the globe.

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The Insect Apocalypse Is Coming: Here Are Five Lessons We Must Learn

Although endangered mammals get all the headlines, a new scientific report warns that over 40 percent of the world’s insects are in danger of going extinct. If insects head toward precipitous decline and extinction, humans can’t be far behind. We need to advance our thinking about insects, their importance and what can be done to save them.

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Here’s Looking At You, Kid.

In words and deeds, Thunberg is the embodiment of philosopher Howard Zinn’s admonition: “We don’t have to engage in grand, heroic actions to participate in the process of change. Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can quietly become a power no government can suppress, a power that can transform the world.”

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The Companies Behind the Burning of the Amazon

The burning of the Amazon and the darkening of skies from Sao Paulo, Brazil, to Santa Cruz, Bolivia, have captured the world’s conscience. Much of the blame for the fires has rightly fallen on Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro for directly encouraging the burning of forests and the seizure of Indigenous Peoples’ lands. But the incentive for the destruction comes from large-scale international meat and soy animal feed companies.

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How Amazon Forest Loss May Affect Water—and Climate—Far Away

The Amazon has already been so degraded that even a small uptick in deforestation could send the forest hurtling toward a transition to something resembling a woodland savanna. But in addition to forever destroying huge sections of the world’s largest rainforest, that shift would release tremendous quantities of planet-warming greenhouse gases which will affect us all.

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Revelator’s 16-plus Best Environmental Books of August

Things are heating up — and not just because it’s August. This past July was the hottest month in recorded history. That makes this month’s new books about climate change essential reading, along with other important new titles on pollution, wildlife, oceans and Indigenous peoples.

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Yanomami Amazon Reserve Invaded by 20,000 Miners; Bolsonaro Fails to Act

Thousands of goldminers (garimpeiros) have illegally invaded Yanomami Park, one of Brazil’s largest indigenous territories. An incursion of this scale has not occurred for many years, bringing back memories among indigenous elders of the terrible period in the late 1980s, when some 40,000 goldminers moved onto their land and about a fifth of the indigenous population died in just seven years due to violence, malaria, malnutrition, mercury poisoning and other causes.

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How to Shop for Safe Organic Foods

Whether you’re just starting out on your organic journey or you’ve been a long-standing practitioner, getting a refresher on what organic is and how to identify organic ingredients is always a good idea.

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What Guarding Rare Rhinos Says About Saving the Planet

The northern white rhinos have been brought to the edge of oblivion by relentless poaching and the widespread loss of suitable habitats. Rhinos in general are being killed off by the thousands each year for their horns. For the guards protecting the animals, the responsibility has a devotional quality to it that photographer Justin Mott captured in a series called “No Man’s Land,” being displayed at the Anastasia Photo gallery in New York.

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Can We Blame Global Warming On Sun Cycles?

Our sun is reaching the end of it’s normal 11 year cycle and is now approaching a period of minimum solar activity. This one’s being dubbed the Grand Solar Minimum. Some say it’s the real cause of climate change and that it’s going to wreak havoc with our weather systems for years to come, possibly even tipping us into a mini ice age. But the numbers tell a very different story…

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A Northwest Passage Journey Finds Little Ice and Big Changes

After decades of travel in the Far North, E360’s Arctic correspondent joins a voyage through the Northwest Passage and witnesses a world being transformed, with ice disappearing, balmy temperatures becoming common, and alien invaders – from plastic waste to new diseases – on the rise.

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The Terrifying Legacy of David Koch

David Koch, one of the two infamous billionaire Koch brothers, died Friday at the age of 79. He was one of the most powerful people in the world over the last three or so decades, and he did his level best to plant the seeds of the climate-change denial movement and stymie any effort to stop the biggest threat to human society

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Tinkering with Intent

Blair realized early in life that he didn’t need a lot to live, and that money and material possessions were not important. Instead he has chosen to value happiness, creativity, and well-being. He shares those values through his public gallery, where there is the chance to be irrevocably changed.

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The Amazon Is Burning. And It’s Because We Eat Beef

The fires burning up the world’s largest tropical rainforest have been raging for three weeks and are the fastest ever recorded in the area. Scientists have warned that the emergency could severely impact climate change efforts. Is it possible that our consumption of meat is to blame?

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The World Is Uniting for International Law, Against Us Empire

“We oppose the extraterritorial application of unilateral measures.” That is not Cuba, Nicaragua, Iran, Russia, or China talking about the economic blockade against Iran and Venezuela, but the European Union. Even allies who have embarrassed themselves by recognizing the phony “interim president” Juan Guaido are saying the US has gone too far.

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How to Sprout Your Own Plant-Based Foods at Home!

If you’re following recent health trends, then it’s probable that you’ve come across the idea of sprouted foods. While some health trends should be taken with a grain of salt, others have a bit more backbone to them. Sprouted foods happen to be one trend to take note of!

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John Pilger: We Are in a WAR SITUATION with China!

In this special episode of Going Underground, legendary journalist and film-maker John Pilger is interviewed on many of the latest issues: looming war with China, the Hong Kong protests, the escalating cold war between the U.S. and Russia, sanctions on Venezuela and Iran, and updates on Julian Assange and Wikileaks.

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Kashmir Could Become the New Palestine

On August 5, India’s Home Minister Amit Shah introduced a bill that divides the Indian State into two parts: the Union Territory of Ladakh and the Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir. The people of Jammu and Kashmir are being increasingly oppressed, their situation representing that of the Palestinians more each day.

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Bearing Witness: The Animal Dialogues

Craig Childs’ book, ‘The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild’ offers compelling tales of creatures large and small, offering us a rare intimate glimpse into the lives of our fellow Earthlings.

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The Perpetual Illusion of Change

While the prevailing global collective dig their heels deeper into sustaining the status quo, many others are becoming activists, enraged by the infinite list of atrocities being committed around the globe. As seemingly more people fight for change these days, notable progress continues to evade us.

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Mercy Beyond Borders

With operations in South Sudan and Haiti, Mercy Beyond Borders brings hope to more than 1,400 women and girls annually by providing educational, economic and empowerment opportunities where there are few options to escape extreme poverty.

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Global Climate Strike Aims to Spur Transformative Change

The world’s youth have infused a new urgency into the global fight against climate change. Through movements like Fridays for Future and Extinction Rebellion, millions of young people have gathered in public squares and busy streets, senate chambers and assembly rooms, to call on government leaders to curb greenhouse gas emissions and enact meaningful environmental policies.

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July 2019 Hottest Month On Record

The July 2019 temperature was on a par with, and possibly marginally higher than, that of July 2016, according to a World Meteorological Organization (WMO) news release pointing an image by the Copernicus Climate Change Programme that is used as the background for above image.

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A Young Poet Tells the Story of Darfur

Home > News > A Young Poet Tells the Story of Darfur
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Grief and resilience live together. –Michelle Obama

A Young Poet Tells the Story of Darfur
–by ted.com, syndicated from ted.com, Aug 09, 2019

I was 10 years old when I learned what the word “genocide” meant. It was 2003, and my people were being brutally attacked because of their race — hundreds of thousands murdered, millions displaced, a nation torn apart at the hands of its own government.

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Faunalytics Index – August 2019

Each month, our Faunalytics Index provides a round-up of data, statistics, and facts gleaned from the most recent research we’ve covered in our library. Our aim is to give you a quick overview of some of the most eye-catching and informative bits of data that could help you be more effective in your advocacy for animals.

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Joshua Trees Facing Extinction

They outlived mammoths and saber-toothed tigers. But without dramatic action to reduce climate change, new research shows Joshua trees won’t survive much past this century.

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Op-Ed: Are We Really so Different from Other Species?

As a biologist who documents new species and behavior in remote places, from sinkholes in Venezuela to treetops in Borneo, I see abundant signs that the future is grim. A recent United Nations report confirmed the terrible truth: One million species on Earth are threatened with extinction.

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Jane Goodall on Climate Change: ‘Something’s Got to Give’

At the age of 26, Dr Jane Goodall pioneered new ways of researching animals including by living with them. Now, aged 85 and a UN Messenger of Peace, she travels more than 300 days a year to share the urgency of taking action on climate change on behalf of all living things and the planet we share.

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James Cameron’s New Docu-Series Will Make You Ditch Plastic and Seafood

James Cameron is teaming up with National Geographic to make a groundbreaking ocean documentary series, which may convince you to ditch plastic and seafood. Named “Mission OceanX,” the six-episode series will follow a hand-picked team of scientists, cinematographers, and filmmakers on board the maiden voyage of the Alucia2 as it sails across the Indian ocean.

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Paul Hawken: ‘We Need to Be Fierce and Fearless’ to Reverse Climate Change

Social entrepreneur and author Paul Hawken is a leading voice in the environmental movement. His visionary ideas emphasize changing the relationship between business and the Earth. As humanity seeks to rise to the challenge of our time, Hawken provides a refreshingly positive and comprehensive approach to global warming solutions…Bioneers sat down with Paul Hawken to learn more about his work and his plan for helping build a more connected world.

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12 Years to Save the Planet? Make That 18 Months

Do you remember the good old days when we had “12 years to save the planet”? Now it seems, there’s a growing consensus that the next 18 months will be critical in dealing with the global heating crisis, among other environmental challenges.

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Why Some People, But Not Others, Choose A Plant-Based Diet

Transitioning to a plant-based diet can be an easy choice for some people, while others may either find it extremely difficult or resist it vehemently. Understanding why some people are amenable to a veg*n diet but others are not is extremely valuable, not just for animal advocates who are trying to reduce animal suffering, but also for companies that are trying to facilitate a shift toward plant-based diets by offering plant-based alternatives to animal products.

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