Get Informed & Dialogue

Author: The CNCL Team

Changing How We Eat Is Complicated

A successful transition to a more plant-based diet requires not only motivation but capability and opportunity. This review summarizes existing research on what helps (and hinders) that process.

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To Confront Climate Change, We Need an Ecological Democracy

Marit Hammond, a lecturer in environmental politics at Keele University in the U.K., advocates for the necessity of an “ecological democracy” in order to meet the climate emergency urgently and sustainably. In this interview, Hammond offers insights on what this new form of democracy would look like and how we can get there.

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Wild Mind: Reclaiming Our Original Wholeness

It’s time to take another look at ourselves — to re-enliven our sense of what it is to be human, to breathe new life into ancient intuitions of who we are, and to learn again to celebrate, as we once did, our instinctive affinity with the Earth community in which we’re rooted.

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More Bad News for Glyphosate

The Glyphosate controversy continues making news around the world and in Australia. The latest news being that the German Government has recently announced that it will phase out all uses for Glyphosate by 2023.

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Saving the Planet Means Overthrowing the Ruling Elites

Friday’s climate strike by students across the globe will have no more impact than the mass mobilizations by women following the election of Donald Trump or the hundreds of thousands of protesters who took to the streets to denounce the Iraq War. This does not mean these protests should not have taken place. They should have. But such demonstrations need to be grounded in the bitter reality that in the corridors of power we do not count.

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Thoughts About Diluting the Animal Rights Message

The victims of our food habits have no one but us to tell the truth about the grave injustice of the ordeal to which we routinely subject them. We owe that truth to them as they queue in the milking parlours and hatcheries and slaughterhouses; and we owe that truth to every single member of our own species.

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Global Climate Strike – Sep. 20–27

By now, you’ve probably received plenty of emails about the Climate Strike on September 20th. You probably already know that masses of people of all ages will join youth in the streets in over 500 US cities. But you might still be wondering, why are all these people striking? Why should I get involved?

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This Is Not the Sixth Extinction. It’s the First Extermination Event.

From the “insect apocalypse” to the “biological annihilation” of 60 percent of all wild animals in the past 50 years, life is careening across every planetary boundary that might stop it from experiencing a “Great Dying” once more. But this atrocity has no goelogical analogue. To call it the “sixth extinction event” is to make what is an active, organized eradication sound like some kind of passive accident. We are in the midst of the First Extermination Event.

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Room to Roam: How Animals Benefit From Wildlife Corridors

Development, resource extraction and roadbuilding have fragmented landscapes and reduced wild spaces making it harder for animals to find food, search for a mate and adapt to a changing climate. Ecologists and conservationists have been working for decades to create wildlife corridors — areas of natural habitat that can reconnect fragmented habitats.

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So What’s Wrong with Wool?

Despite the fact that farming sheep is at least as harmful to the environment as farming cows, many sheep raised for wool are treated very cruelly. This video reveals the very disturbing treatment of sheep on an Australian wool farm, which is unfortunately considered “treatment as usual” across Australia and much of the world.

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The Natural World Can Help Save Us From Climate Catastrophe

To prevent a full-spectrum catastrophe, we need not only to decarbonise our economy in the shortest possible time, but also to draw down carbon dioxide that has already been released.T But how? The greatest potential identified so far is in protecting and restoring natural forests and allowing native trees to repopulate deforested land.

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How to Have Difficult Conversations

Campaigners aren’t known for being contemplative. By definition they are trying to change something beyond themselves. But what if collective introspection made us into better campaigners by improving our ability to listen and learn, especially from those we disagree with?

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The Work Of Love Is To Love

My own time on earth has led me to believe in two powerful instruments that turn experience into love: holding and listening. For every time I have held or been held, every time I have listened or been listened to, experience burns like wood in that eternal fire and I find myself in the presence of love.

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The Rise of a New Climate Activism

Climate activism isn’t new, but the last year has seen a resurgence in attention devoted to the subject. For many campaigners, who have grown weary of watching their warnings fall on deaf ears, it has felt like hope has arrived at last.

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Climate Catastrophe Comes for Europe

When most people think of climate change, what come to mind are the poles, Asia’s fast vanishing glaciers, or Australia, where punishing droughts are drying up the sub-continent’s longest river, the Murray. But climate change is an equal opportunity disrupter, and Europe is facing a one-two punch of too much water in the north and center and not enough in the south.

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Ecological Trauma and Common Addiction

Rex Weyler defines “ecological trauma” as the experience of witnessing – consciously or not – the pervasive abuse and destruction of the natural world, of which we are a part, and for which we have a primal affinity.

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How to Get Better at Thrift Shopping

“Shop second-hand” is a message often touted by eco-minded individuals, myself included. “It’s good for the planet! It’s good for your wallet!” we say, which is all good advice, but usually that’s where it ends. Fortunately, some professional guidance for navigating thrift stores is at hand.

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Ecosocialism & Just Transition

Climate change requires major societal change. But how do we ensure this transformation is done in a fair and just manner? John Bellamy Foster—a renowned environmental sociologist and editor of Monthly Review—takes a look at the idea of the Just Transition, arguing that any strategy to save the planet must go beyond the strictures of capitalism.

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Cruel Taiji Dolphin Drive Hunt Season Underway

Fishermen in the coastal town of Taiji, Japan have begun their controversial annual dolphin hunt. These hunts run from September to April, and involve the corralling of dolphins at sea by small boats and driving them into the confines of a cove where they are slaughtered for meat or kept alive for lucrative sale to marine parks and aquaria across the globe.

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The Insect Apocalypse Is Coming: Here Are Five Lessons We Must Learn

Although endangered mammals get all the headlines, a new scientific report warns that over 40 percent of the world’s insects are in danger of going extinct. If insects head toward precipitous decline and extinction, humans can’t be far behind. We need to advance our thinking about insects, their importance and what can be done to save them.

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Here’s Looking At You, Kid.

In words and deeds, Thunberg is the embodiment of philosopher Howard Zinn’s admonition: “We don’t have to engage in grand, heroic actions to participate in the process of change. Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can quietly become a power no government can suppress, a power that can transform the world.”

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The Companies Behind the Burning of the Amazon

The burning of the Amazon and the darkening of skies from Sao Paulo, Brazil, to Santa Cruz, Bolivia, have captured the world’s conscience. Much of the blame for the fires has rightly fallen on Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro for directly encouraging the burning of forests and the seizure of Indigenous Peoples’ lands. But the incentive for the destruction comes from large-scale international meat and soy animal feed companies.

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How Amazon Forest Loss May Affect Water—and Climate—Far Away

The Amazon has already been so degraded that even a small uptick in deforestation could send the forest hurtling toward a transition to something resembling a woodland savanna. But in addition to forever destroying huge sections of the world’s largest rainforest, that shift would release tremendous quantities of planet-warming greenhouse gases which will affect us all.

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Revelator’s 16-plus Best Environmental Books of August

Things are heating up — and not just because it’s August. This past July was the hottest month in recorded history. That makes this month’s new books about climate change essential reading, along with other important new titles on pollution, wildlife, oceans and Indigenous peoples.

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Yanomami Amazon Reserve Invaded by 20,000 Miners; Bolsonaro Fails to Act

Thousands of goldminers (garimpeiros) have illegally invaded Yanomami Park, one of Brazil’s largest indigenous territories. An incursion of this scale has not occurred for many years, bringing back memories among indigenous elders of the terrible period in the late 1980s, when some 40,000 goldminers moved onto their land and about a fifth of the indigenous population died in just seven years due to violence, malaria, malnutrition, mercury poisoning and other causes.

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How to Shop for Safe Organic Foods

Whether you’re just starting out on your organic journey or you’ve been a long-standing practitioner, getting a refresher on what organic is and how to identify organic ingredients is always a good idea.

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What Guarding Rare Rhinos Says About Saving the Planet

The northern white rhinos have been brought to the edge of oblivion by relentless poaching and the widespread loss of suitable habitats. Rhinos in general are being killed off by the thousands each year for their horns. For the guards protecting the animals, the responsibility has a devotional quality to it that photographer Justin Mott captured in a series called “No Man’s Land,” being displayed at the Anastasia Photo gallery in New York.

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Can We Blame Global Warming On Sun Cycles?

Our sun is reaching the end of it’s normal 11 year cycle and is now approaching a period of minimum solar activity. This one’s being dubbed the Grand Solar Minimum. Some say it’s the real cause of climate change and that it’s going to wreak havoc with our weather systems for years to come, possibly even tipping us into a mini ice age. But the numbers tell a very different story…

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A Northwest Passage Journey Finds Little Ice and Big Changes

After decades of travel in the Far North, E360’s Arctic correspondent joins a voyage through the Northwest Passage and witnesses a world being transformed, with ice disappearing, balmy temperatures becoming common, and alien invaders – from plastic waste to new diseases – on the rise.

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The Terrifying Legacy of David Koch

David Koch, one of the two infamous billionaire Koch brothers, died Friday at the age of 79. He was one of the most powerful people in the world over the last three or so decades, and he did his level best to plant the seeds of the climate-change denial movement and stymie any effort to stop the biggest threat to human society

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Tinkering with Intent

Blair realized early in life that he didn’t need a lot to live, and that money and material possessions were not important. Instead he has chosen to value happiness, creativity, and well-being. He shares those values through his public gallery, where there is the chance to be irrevocably changed.

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The Amazon Is Burning. And It’s Because We Eat Beef

The fires burning up the world’s largest tropical rainforest have been raging for three weeks and are the fastest ever recorded in the area. Scientists have warned that the emergency could severely impact climate change efforts. Is it possible that our consumption of meat is to blame?

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